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HCC
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Nov. 8, 2013
 
HCC hosts fifth annual American Indian Heritage Month Celebration, receives proclamation
 
WELDON, N.C. – Halifax Community College (HCC) hosted its fifth annual American Indian Heritage Month celebration, Nov. 5 at The Centre. Festivities included a free educational program catered to middle and high school students and adults. The event provided an opportunity to learn about American Indian culture and traditions.

The 2013 program featured a welcome and remarks from HCC President Dr. Ervin V. Griffin Sr., greetings from Haliwa-Saponi Chief Ronald Richardson, speaker introduction by HCC Board of Trustees Chair Bernella DeLaMora, presentation of gifts by HCC Vice President of Academic Affairs Dr. Deryl Davis Fulmer, and a dance demonstration by Haliwa-Saponi Tribe Youth Services Director Sharon Berrun and the Dancers of the Haliwa-Saponi Tribe including Samantha Daniel (Tribal Princess), Celestial Daniel, Amy Hewlin, Ariel Hewlin, Jacob Hewlin, Dakota Lynch and Tyler Richardson. Drummers were Jesse Richardson, Claude Richardson, Joshua (B.J.) Richardson and Tyler Richardson.

The keynote speaker for the event was Executive Director of the N.C. Commission of Indian Affairs Gregory A. Richardson who discussed challenges that American Indian tribes face today. After his address, Richardson presented Griffin and DeLaMora with a signed proclamation from N.C. Governor Pat McCrory that recognizes November 2013 as American Indian Heritage Month. The proclamation can be found at
http://www.ncdcr.gov/Portals/7/images/AI/2013/IHM%202013.pdf.

The main program was followed by demonstrations and vendors including:
  • Karen Harley (corn husk dolls)
  • Brian and Trina Lynch (silver jewelry)
  • David Lynch (bows and arrows)
  • Matilda Mills (beaded jewelry)
  • Laura Richardson (dreamcatchers)
Mills on Wheels provided samples of American Indian cuisine including Saponi stew and fry bread.

North Carolina’s American Indian population totals more than 100,000. It is the largest American Indian population east of the Mississippi River, sixth largest in the nation. There are eight American Indian tribes in North Carolina.

This event was part of the HCC Lyceum Series of Special Events that will run throughout 2013-14. The public is invited and encouraged to participate in all events. Unless otherwise noted, guests attend at no charge and events will be held in The Centre. This event was funded in part by the U.S. Department of Education PBI Formula Grant.

About the Keynote Speaker Gregory A. Richardson
Gregory A. Richardson is the executive director of the North Carolina Commission of Indian Affairs, which is housed within the N.C. Department of Administration in Raleigh. He was appointed to this post in February 1995. He previously served as assistant to the deputy assistant secretary for Public and Indian Housing at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development in Washington, D.C. Also, he has served as executive director of the North Carolina Indian Housing Authority in Fayetteville, as well as in numerous management positions at the Commission of Indian Affairs since 1975.

As the executive director, Richardson is responsible for the overall administration and oversight of all commission programs and operations. The Commission administers a Community Services Program, Educational Talent Search Program, Housing Assistance Program and a Workforce Investment Act Program. He supervises 32 employees and a budget of $3.5 million, which consist of state appropriations and federal grant funding.

A member of the state-recognized Haliwa-Saponi Indian Tribe, Richardson has testified before the Select Committee on Indian Affairs in Washington, D.C., the state Legislative Committees and has made presentations at numerous conferences, hearing and seminars on Indian Affairs. He is also a Vietnam veteran.

Richardson has served as chairman of the U.S. Census Advisory Committee on American Indians and Alaska Natives, and he serves on the Board of Directors of United Tribes of North Carolina and is a Regional Representative for the Governor’s Interstate Indian Council.

A graduate of Aurelian Springs High School in Halifax County, Richardson holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Business Management and an Associate in Applied Science Degree in Business Management. He is a Certified Public Housing Manager and holds a Public Managers’ Certificate from the state of North Carolina.
1
The Dancers of the Haliwa-Saponi Tribe performed during the fifth annual American Indian Heritage Month celebration held on Nov. 5 at The Centre at HCC.
2
Executive Director of the N.C. Commission of Indian Affairs Gregory A. Richardson, left, presented HCC President Dr. Ervin V. Griffin Sr., right, and HCC Board of Trustees Chair Bernella DeLaMora with a signed proclamation from N.C. Governor Pat McCrory that recognizes November 2013 as American Indian Heritage Month.
 
3
Dancers of the Haliwa-Saponi Tribe and audience members joined hands and performed the Friendship Dance at the end of the HCC American Indian Heritage Celebration.
 
 
Halifax Community College’s Mission
Halifax Community College strives to meet the diverse needs of our community by providing high-quality, accessible and affordable education and services for a rapidly changing and globally competitive marketplace.
 
Primary Media Contact: Melanie Temple, Director of Public Relations and Marketing, mtemple295@halifaxcc.edu, 252-538-4319

Secondary Media Contact: Dr. Dianne Rhoades, Vice President of Institutional Advancement, Halifax Community College and Executive Director of the Halifax Community College Foundation Inc., dbarnes-rhoades128@halifaxcc.edu, 252-536-7239